Focus on What You Can Control: Financial Do’s and Don’ts During the Crisis

Our friends at Warren Averett Asset Management shared with us some Do’s and Don’ts for financially weathering the current situation we are all facing:     Dear Clients and Friends, COVID-19 is not the first crisis we have endured, and it will likely not be the last. While we have not experienced the particular pain points of this virus all at one time before—like schools shutting down and grocery stores running low on items—we do have experience over the past several decades with some other pretty nasty events, including 1970’s energy crisis, 1980’s Black Monday, and 1990’s savings and loan

Size Doesn’t Matter When It Comes to Competing With Your Big Business Competition

Written by guest blogger: Marissa Perez, Business POP There are several misconceptions about running a small business; some think entrepreneurs have all the time in the world since they create their own schedule, while others think huge risks are a daily task needed to see success. As a small business owner, you know these aren’t true, but you still may have misconceptions of your own, one of them being that you can’t possibly compete with your larger competition. You won’t be taking down Amazon anytime soon, of course, but you can still compete with the best of them. Find Smart

If You’re Not Onboard, Get Off the Ship!

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting The best piece of advice I heard at the recent SHRM19 National Conference came from Cy Wakeman’s session “Business Readiness: Ensuring Our Teams are Ready for What’s Next.” As a consultant, I spend a great deal of my time helping organizations navigate change, from determining what change is needed to creating the roadmap of how to accomplish the change to how to get employee buy-in. The hardest part is often getting employees on board, helping them understand the need for change and addressing their resistance. The current change management process caters too much

Leadership Reminders From my Night in O’Hare

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting  Things don’t always go as planned.  After a great week at SHRM19 in Las Vegas, I planned to be back in the comforts of my own home Wednesday night. But thanks to bad weather and a missed connection, I spent the night at Chicago O’Hare Airport. I was exhausted and just wanted to get home. But what could have been a miserable experience turned out to be an adventure. And as I sit here watching the sun come up over Chicago, waiting for my flight home, I’m reminded of a few leadership lessons. 

Five Quick Teambuilding Activities

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting I once put on about 30 articles of clothing in a matter of a couple of minutes. My team won. I once had to build a wooden tower while blindfolded and being instructed by others what to do. My team lost. I did these things (and many more) at a previous employer where we had morning meetings and every Friday was Fun Friday. We’d forego the regular meeting content of financials, project updates, and announcements every Friday morning to have fifteen minutes of fun. It was the weekly meeting everyone looked forward to

Sometimes You Will Fail, And That’s Okay

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again.” During a recent conversation with a client, he raised a concern about his leadership team expecting him to make every decision. The previous leadership set that expectation, but he wants to empower his team to make decisions they are capable of making. The conversation reminded me of when my children were younger and learning new skills, like riding a bike. My youngest is very headstrong and lacks patience (he doesn’t take after his mother at all). If he doesn’t get it right the

What’s on Your Career Bucket List?

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting The end of the school year brings final exams, award ceremonies, parties, and best of all, summer. My boys have been counting down the days. And with their countdown comes the usual question I face every year. “What are we doing this summer?” I always try to do fun things with them throughout the summer that they will each enjoy. But with three boys ranging from 9 to 15, that’s not always easy. Their interests don’t always match up. What my nine-year-old finds thrilling, my fifteen-year-old finds more boring than watching paint dry.

The Essentials of Professional Development

Written by: Steve Graham As a coach, I often work with clients who are needy for knowledge.  They desire to grow professionally and often feel stuck in their current work environment.  It is no secret that when an organization values developing their people, the benefits for both the employee and organization are numerous.  The benefits often include: lower turnover, increased engagement, and a smarter workforce. Professional development goes beyond cookie-cutter training programs.  It involves a deeper commitment to learning. Learning can take various shapes within an organization. It can be organic, formalized, personalized, or on-demand.  Whatever the shape, the approach

Are We Taking the Human Out of Human Resources?

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting My first job in HR was with a Professional Employer Organization (PEO) in Virginia. It was a great opportunity for me to learn about the HR field very quickly and I loved it. But there was one thing I absolutely hated about my job, and that was having to terminate employees over the phone. We managed clients in the 48 continental states and whenever a client needed to terminate an employee, that task fell to me. Imagine a manager half way across the country pulling an employee into an office and saying “I

Why Attendance Occurrence Programs are Bad for Business

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting In 2003 I got one of those calls every child dreads. My mother was in the hospital and being rushed into emergency surgery. Turned out she had an allergic reaction to a medication and it almost killed her. She was at work when she started to notice something wasn’t right and within a matter of a couple of hours, her hands swelled up so much that she had to have emergency surgery to cut her hands open to relieve the pressure. She ended up with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and was in the Intensive Cardiac