The Essentials of Professional Development

Written by: Steve Graham As a coach, I often work with clients who are needy for knowledge.  They desire to grow professionally and often feel stuck in their current work environment.  It is no secret that when an organization values developing their people, the benefits for both the employee and organization are numerous.  The benefits often include: lower turnover, increased engagement, and a smarter workforce. Professional development goes beyond cookie-cutter training programs.  It involves a deeper commitment to learning. Learning can take various shapes within an organization. It can be organic, formalized, personalized, or on-demand.  Whatever the shape, the approach

5 Ideas for Retaining Talent in a Tough Labor Market

Most HR professionals and business leaders today are concerned about finding and keeping talent.  If you are going to focus on one, I’d suggest you start first by focusing on retaining talent. Broadly, the best way to retain talent is to create an environment where people have key needs met. These needs are described in Daniel Pink’s book Drive. They are 1) The need to direct their own lives 2) The desire to do better for ourselves and our world 3) To learn and create new things. But given these three things, what are some practices that can actually be

Why Attendance Occurrence Programs are Bad for Business

Written by: Lorrie Coffey, Horizon Point Consulting In 2003 I got one of those calls every child dreads. My mother was in the hospital and being rushed into emergency surgery. Turned out she had an allergic reaction to a medication and it almost killed her. She was at work when she started to notice something wasn’t right and within a matter of a couple of hours, her hands swelled up so much that she had to have emergency surgery to cut her hands open to relieve the pressure. She ended up with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and was in the Intensive Cardiac

3 Ways to Create Insights for Learning

“Mom, I made a connection!” we hear our son say quite frequently now. We didn’t teach him about “connections” so someone at school must be talking about paying attention to be able to make connections between information and learning. For example, a couple of weeks ago they read a book about Rosie an Engineer and then “engineered” a plane to see if it would fly.    He loved it- the building the plane part, not the reading ☺ This past weekend, he was playing in the front yard and came running in. “Mom, Mom! Come outside, I need to show you

5 Things To Consider in Pursuing Passion in Work

I always seem to get the best insights into my children’s minds from the front seat of the car when they don’t think I’m listening.  It usually comes in the form of backseat dialogue between themselves and a friend. One particular day driving to baseball practice, a friend of my son’s was with us and he out of the blue stated, “I want to be a lawyer when I grow up.” My son responded, “Why?” “So I can make a bunch of money,” he said. I guess my son saw this as an invitation to declare what he wanted to

Are Your Top Employees Also Your Most Toxic?

Picture this: There is an employee at your company that you’ve had multiple complaints against. They treat other employees with a total lack of respect and maybe even the treat customers the same way. They have created a hostile work environment in which other employees dread having to work with them, go out of their way to avoid them both in their tasks and just around the office in general, and customers refuse to deal with them. But they are one of your company’s top performers or they have a knowledge base that no one else in your company has.

The Most Popular Emerging Employee Benefit is…

I remember thinking, how am I going to do this? I had just started my first full-time job out of college, and I was getting married that year.  I had been given two weeks of vacation for my first year that I had to earn throughout the year. If I wanted to take a honeymoon and be off a day or two before the wedding, I really had almost no time left to take off.  And a couple of my good friends were getting married that summer too, and I was in their weddings out of town. Was I going

4 Training Facilitation Tips Gleaned from a Five-Year-Old

“Mommy,” my five-year-old said from the backseat of the car on the way to school one morning, “What do you do for work (pronounced more like wurk)?” I wasn’t sure where her question was coming from, but in trying to think about how to describe what I do to so her Pre-K mind would understand, I quickly thought that “consulting” wasn’t going to make sense. So, I chose instead to describe what I do in the context of what I was scheduled to do that day. “Well, today, I’m going to train some people on their first day of work.

Creating a Teaching Culture

Written by: Lorrie Howard, Horizon Point Consulting My twelve-year-old son had his first experience with interviewing this week. He is applying to a special program for high school and as part of the application process he had to participate in a panel interview with members of the program administration. Naturally, he was nervous. Luckily the interview was scheduled on very short notice so he didn’t have too much time to overthink it. As I sat in the waiting area with him and his best friend before their interviews, I put on my recruiter hat and gave them some basic interviewing

4 Ways to State Your Intentions in Order to Drive the Best Outcomes

I’m preparing to take my kids into Target, Lord help me. I just need to get some necessities.  I park the car, turn and look them in the eye and tell them, “We are not going to the toy section.  We are here to get milk, a card for someone, and some toilet paper. You will both walk beside me and the cart.  You will not run, and you will not ask if you can go look at toys, okay?” I get “yes ma’am”.  And then ask them to repeat back to me what I just said and what they