3 Things Leaders Don’t Do in Times of Crisis

We are still in the midst of an unprecedented time in our country and world, with so many unknowns related to COVID-19 and its impact on quite literally everything. Last week, I wrote about 4 things leaders do in times of crisis based on my observations of leaders in action. Well, we’ve been on this train of crisis for over a week now locally, and just like there are observations about how to behave as a leader, I’ve been exposed to how not to behave as a leader during times of distress. Through further observations, here are three things leaders

4 Keys to Leading through Crisis

We are experiencing unprecedented times given the ever-evolving issues with COVID-19.  It is scary and unnerving for everyone, especially those leading during this time of crisis.   I’ve been watching a few leaders in action over these last few days.  Their actions have provided some insights into the courage, energy, and attitude that is required to inspire and influence others when things are uncertain, novel, and anxiety-ridden.  Here is what I’ve learned leaders need to do during all situations of leadership, but most especially when leading through a crisis:  1. Lead by Example:  First, leaders do what they say they will

Our Schedules Communicate Priorities

On a Sunday morning about 7 AM, I was in the middle of a run. It was a quiet, beautiful fall morning until I looped back around and through the sports and water park complex near my house.  Cars started driving by and turning into the parking lot by the tennis center. I could hear an abundance of tennis balls popping off rackets as, what seemed to be, many people warming up. I’ve run by on other Sunday mornings about that time to see what couldn’t be older than five and six-year-olds warming up for soccer matches. The minivans and

Should We Throw Touch as a Love Language at Work out the Window?

The Five Love Languages for romantic relationships and parents and children can also be applied at work.  Adapted to be the Five Love Languages of Appreciation instead of love in the workplace, the approach is the same. Know what other people need and give them that.  Even though the developers of this concept replace “appreciation” for “love” when applied to the workplace, I have no problem with calling it love languages at work.  Our workplaces can and are better places when we show love in the right way and context everywhere we go.  Including the office. Especially in the office. 

The Point’s Top 10 Posts of 2019

2019 has been a great year for us here at Horizon Point. We have provided insight on a wide variety of topics throughout the year. To put it simply, every post we’ve written and shared, no matter the subject, we’ve strived to inform you on subjects that will help you professionally. And we’re always glad to help you on your quest for knowledge to better your career, your work environment, or your organization! Here is a look back at The Point’s Top 10 Posts of 2019: 10. Creating a Teaching Culture 9. 4 Training Facilitation Tips Gleaned from a Five-Year-Old

2019 Book of the Year

Ideas. They move the world forward. They make businesses and communities succeed through growth and innovation in an everchanging marketplace. But more importantly, ideas are important for what they do and create for the individual. Ideas illuminate us and those around us. In our 2019 Book of the Year, What Do You Do With an Idea?, we can see how ideas impact the individual that then impact the world. Creating is one of the most special and meaningful things we can do as humans. And in order for us to create and generate ideas, we have to create homes, workplaces,

Leaders, So What Is Skill and What Is Will?

Related Blog Posts: Leaders, Know the Skill and Will of Those You Lead The Lactation Consultant For the Love, Leave Me Alone!: How (Not) to Lead When Skill and Will Are High Tell 🡪Show 🡪 Do: Leading when Someone has High Will and Low Skill Find Another Seat (or Challenge) or Get Off the Bus? How to Lead when Skill is High but Will is Low A Final Thought on Leading for Skill and Will: It’s a Long Term Game, Not a Short One

Size Doesn’t Matter When It Comes to Competing With Your Big Business Competition

Written by guest blogger: Marissa Perez, Business POP There are several misconceptions about running a small business; some think entrepreneurs have all the time in the world since they create their own schedule, while others think huge risks are a daily task needed to see success. As a small business owner, you know these aren’t true, but you still may have misconceptions of your own, one of them being that you can’t possibly compete with your larger competition. You won’t be taking down Amazon anytime soon, of course, but you can still compete with the best of them. Find Smart

The Lactation Consultant For the Love, Leave Me Alone!: How (Not) to Lead When Skill and Will Are High

Our third child came into the world just perfect, then he stopped breathing and turned blue when he tried to nurse.  After two scary attempts at feeding, the pediatrician on call came in and told us he thought he had a tracheoesophageal fistula.  In laymen’s terms, I came to understand this as a hole between the esophagus and the trachea causing fluid to pass between these two “tubes” when it isn’t supposed to.   This would require surgery to correct, thus requiring a transfer to the NICU.   Scary to say the least, but after getting our new blessing to the

Autonomy and Productivity… Better Together!

Tuesdays from 4:00- 5:00 pm.  In the car. While our middle child is in gymnastics, I have found that this hour of concentrated time in a concentrated space leads to some productive homework time with my oldest.  While his newborn brother snoozes in his car seat, we tackle third-grade homework. And there is a lot of it.  Take our list for Tuesday of this past week:  -A math worksheet due Wednesday -At least 10 minutes of multiplication facts practice that has to be signed off on each day by a parent for a grade -Practice for a vocabulary test on