The Point’s Top 10 Posts of 2019

2019 has been a great year for us here at Horizon Point. We have provided insight on a wide variety of topics throughout the year. To put it simply, every post we’ve written and shared, no matter the subject, we’ve strived to inform you on subjects that will help you professionally. And we’re always glad to help you on your quest for knowledge to better your career, your work environment, or your organization! Here is a look back at The Point’s Top 10 Posts of 2019: 10. Creating a Teaching Culture 9. 4 Training Facilitation Tips Gleaned from a Five-Year-Old

2019 Book of the Year

Ideas. They move the world forward. They make businesses and communities succeed through growth and innovation in an everchanging marketplace. But more importantly, ideas are important for what they do and create for the individual. Ideas illuminate us and those around us. In our 2019 Book of the Year, What Do You Do With an Idea?, we can see how ideas impact the individual that then impact the world. Creating is one of the most special and meaningful things we can do as humans. And in order for us to create and generate ideas, we have to create homes, workplaces,

3 Tips for Leading Well in 2020

I enjoyed the opportunity to hear Karith Foster speak recently.  If you haven’t had an opportunity to check her out, she is well worth it.  She combines humor and storytelling to make simple, but profound points about leading and living well.  In her address, she talked about the ABCs necessary to be a leader in 2020.  A. Ask for help & Ask for what you want.    Asking for help may seem contrary to what leaders should do, but as I heard Brene Brown say in another keynote speech, asking for help is actually the best way to create trust.  As

A Pound of Prevention

Written by: Jillian Miles, Horizon Point Consulting “A pound of prevention is worth an ounce of cure” is a phrase I heard for the first time this week. I was at lunch with an attorney who specializes in employment law, and she said that phrase as we were talking about clients who don’t see the benefit of proactive, preventative measures and instead just hope everything turns out alright. I immediately wrote it down and googled when I got home, and the internet says it’s a Benjamin Franklin quote. Apparently, Franklin wrote an anonymous letter to his own newspaper in Philadelphia