The Best Financial Planning Tips For Recent College Grads

Man holding piggy bank, closeup

Written by guest blogger: Jackie Waters. Jackie is passionate about sustainability and simplicity.  She runs hyper-tidy.com, providing advice on being…Hyper Tidy! Graduating college is a huge milestone in anyone’s life, but it can also be a little scary. Where do you go from here? How do you start building savings while you’re looking for your dream job? Those questions can be overwhelming if you let them, so the first step is to sit down and write out a plan. Think about your goals and how you can shape them; are you just ready to plan for the immediate future, or do you

Scholarship Search – Where do I begin?

blog_65f0e70054eaf3d20ddf3cf402b4d8e7

Whether you are a freshman in high school or closing in on your junior year, scholarship searching should be at the top of your to-do list. Paying for college is expensive and scholarships are a great way to help soften the financial blow for students and parents. Here are a 7 few tips to help you get started: 1. Keep track of your high school activities. Well-rounded students are favored when scholarship boards are sifting through hundreds or thousands of applications. If you aren’t already, get involved! Join clubs in school, volunteer in your community and/or get a part-time job.

Paying for College – What are the options?

college money_3995f3641c977ddfa52207936bb243a0

The average cost of college is $23,000 per year and rising annually. This is intimidating for both students and parents alike. However, there are tons of scholarships and financial aid tools out there. Just knowing where to go for information is worth reading this article. So, let’s get started. First, you should become familiar with the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Completing this application is essential for high school students who will be applying for scholarships. Many scholarships require the FAFSA application be completed prior to completing their application. Here is a link to the website and online

Resumes – A Must for High School Students

graduate_2519d9a0fbba7dd86c1704cb00b0ee05

A resume is essential for college or career bound high school students. Applying for colleges is competitive, as is applying for a job. An easy to read, well-developed resume that sets you apart from others can help put you in a favorable position. So, how do you get started? First, you should make a comprehensive list of your academic achievements and extracurricular activities. Be sure to include all activities, honors, jobs, internships, volunteer hours, and so on. Ask others for input. Teachers, counselors, parents and friends can be helpful in creating your list. Next, you can begin to build your

How to Write a Killer College Application and/or Scholarship Essay

scholarship application_4bdf52d8c0b27fd2b0a024ed65ac681e

Writing essays for college or scholarship applications can be intimidating. Just getting started can be a daunting task. Here are easy to follow steps for writing a killer essay: 1. Follow the instructions. This is a very important step. Read and re-read the instructions and make sure you follow them accordingly. 2. Make your essay personal. The reader should feel like they know you. Share your talents, passions and values. Include why you want to go to college and why you should be awarded the scholarship. Share information about why you’re interested in the field and any extracurricular activities, volunteer

What you need to complete a college application

bigstock-A-yellow-folder-with-the-label-58272971_1f2f32c008f3c59ce38483e3f6c24772

Every college application is different, and before you begin your college applications, you need to make sure you understand the ins and outs of applications. Once you understand the basics, you can gather information that will most likely be standard on most applications, to save you time and effort in completing all the materials. Here is list of what you most likely will need:   *Some schools require that this information be filled in on the application, others request a resume that contains this type of information. Save yourself some time and energy by gathering this information before you sit

3 Ways to Keep Your Adult Kids from Moving Back in with You

The statistics are startling.  In 2009, 80% of college graduates moved back in with their parents according to CNN Money.  That’s just because the economy was so bad then you say. Probably not. Market Watch reported that a Pew Research Center Analysis determined that in 2012, 36% of adults ages 18-36 live at home with their parents.   That’s more than 1/3 of young adults in America not out on their own.  If you consider someone over 30 a “young adult”.  And Tim Elmore reports in his new book, 12 Huge Mistakes Parents Can Avoid, that in 2013 85% of college

Mollie’s List of Must Haves For Dorm Living

140601_0000_78ffc07cb8a87194cb325b206f34be3e

My roommate and I do not live in the same town so we decided to meet up and shop together. As soon as we started in Bed, Bath, and Beyond we became overwhelmed. We finally decided on the colors we both liked and then everything fell into place. I have always been excited about decorating my dorm room! I knew how I wanted to decorate it but I didn’t realize that I had to plan to get everything I would need for the next year! The bedding and decretive things were fun to find, but then I had to start

The only question you need to ask when choosing a college

college sign_c9f9148470af393f7139b96e2f18147d

The decision making process for choosing a college, should look like this: career a major a college Not the other way around.  Most people look at the other way around. With this being said, college is a means to the end of pursuing a meaningful and lucrative career. And with that being said, the only thing you should ask when choosing a college (after you’ve made sure you’ve thoroughly asked yourself and determined what career direction you want to take) should be: What are the college’s placement rates or graduate outcomes from the program/major you are planning to pursue? This should be

Dream Job

bigstock-Dream-Job-41003626_d75f17d6e64bfc031749a9bc0470c829

After finishing my senior year, I will start the next four years deciding what I want to do for the rest of my life. I will have to consider the economy and job markets when deciding on a major and future career, but I don’t want to neglect what I might be best at doing and what I would enjoy. If money and unemployment didn’t matter my choice would be a lot easier. I would rule out any job that has anything to do with blood, makes me work with spreadsheets, or forces me to understand chemistry. With those jobs